FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
HANGAR-TALK 2006 PREVIOUS MAULE PILOTS - till AUG 25,2006

 
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    MaulePilots.Org Forum Index -> Script from previous MaulePilots Quicktopics Forum
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
admin
Guest





PostPosted: Sat Aug 26, 2006 2:28 pm    Post subject: HANGAR-TALK 2006 PREVIOUS MAULE PILOTS - till AUG 25,2006 Reply with quote

OLDEST MESSAGES FIRST (sorted by Date)

48 AeroVelocity 01-14-2006 02:12 PM ET (US)
Here is lodge info on Spotted Bear(8U4), Wilderness Lodge. There is camping on the strip. There is float landing on nearby Hungry Horse Res. Nearest Phone is 3 miles at the USFS. Just a hop up and over the Mountain to Flathead Valley, Glacier Park, Bigfork, Whitefish, Kalispell. http://www.wildmontana.com/

---------------------------------------------------------------------

49 Dick Butz 01-21-2006 04:49 PM ET (US)
Last fall I ground looped my Maule and I am sure that I didn't have steering on the stock Maule tailwheel...I have 800x6 mains and I would like to have a better (Scott 3200?) tailwheel and a larger, softer tire like a 400x4 glider tire...Any suggestions or comments on the optimum hard surface tailwheel setup?... dickbutz@therock.bm

---------------------------------------------------------------------
50 jeremy 01-21-2006 06:41 PM ET (US)
Dick, Yor tailwheel had nothing to do with the groundloop. In the days of tailskids, groundloops still happened. I have many years of hard bush work in Maules with Maule t'wheels. Ihave damaged as many Scotts as Maules and have taken off and landed often enough with nothing or a hunk of wood tied back there. With Maule and Scott, maintenance is the issue. That little wheel is hitting the ground at up to 65mph, at an angle to 21.5 degrees, with a load of as much as 700lbs, and each time a prop blade passes under the cowl, rocks and dirt are thrown at it up to 5600 or 8400 times per minute. The upper lube grease can migrate down to the anti shimmy compartment especially in summer. The leaf springs are a wear item and should be a 45 degree to the ground. The attyach bolts (4) should be kept tight. The steering springs and chains should have proper adjustment and be the correct ones for either Scott or Maule. The tyre pressure should be 45lb min aqnd 55lb max. If you have broken a tailwheel then you can easily do a wheel landing and not put the tail down until off the runway unless carrying a heavy load.
Jeremy www.maules.com

---------------------------------------------------------------------
51 Dick Butz 01-22-2006 07:23 AM ET (US)
Thanx Jerey...I didn't mean that the tailwheel caused the ground loop, I did that all by myself...It's just that I seemed to loose steering on my rollout (yes the yoke was back) The tail wheel is new direct from Maule so I assume that it is good...What is the correct setup for the springs and chains as it is possible that is the problem...I have a new Maule spring to put on but I didn't because there is only 450 hours on the plane...Thanx again...Dick

---------------------------------------------------------------------
52 jeremy 01-22-2006 03:16 PM ET (US)
Unfortunately, re. the leaf spring, it's the angle that is important regardless of hours. The steering springs must be heavy one on the right and the chains with no slack or causing a little compression on the springs with tailwheel and rudder centered. The 4 bolts must be tight including the swivel housing to leafspring, last possible castellation. There should be a few lbs of drag on the tailwheel friction area and the bearing preload is done with shims which are usually stored under the cap. the drag should not be so much that moving the rudder won't move the tailwheel swivel.
Jeremy www.maules.com

---------------------------------------------------------------------
53 LIVEOAKRICK@aol.com 01-22-2006 10:07 PM ET (US)
Dick,

What condition was the surface that you were landing on. I have a grass strip and got into a situation that I had no control of. What I finally figured out was that my wheels were skidding because I was lightly applying brakes. Wet grass is like landing on ice. Don't know what your situation was but there's my 2 cents.

Rick

---------------------------------------------------------------------
54 01-22-2006 10:53 PM ET (US)
Jeremy,

Sorry to jump in here but I'm seeing an occasional shimmy problem myself.
I get tailwheel shimmy at higher touchdown speed and heavy tail loading. Forward elevator to relieve the downward force will stop the shimmy, not necessarily the best solution if hard braking is also required. My spring angle looks good and the brackets are verified tight. I have not checked the preload although the tailwheel does lockup and unlock fine with a distinctive click while pushing it around on the ground. Taxi feels fine also. I run between 50-55 psi in the tire and it is wearing normally. My springs (I do have the large / small springs) hang slightly and it appears judging by your comments they may be too loose.

Just to verify, heavy spring goes on the right and both springs should just be under compression with no slack? If there is slack how would you go about removing it? It would appear you would not want to remove just one link in the chain on one side and cause an imbalance but removing two links (one each side to keep them balanced) I think is going to put too much compression on the springs, as in almost bottoming them out or nearly so. The only real solution I can see would be to fab some new attachment links for the connection point at the end of each spring to take up the slack. Is that the correct method?

Thanks for your input,

Mark
1971 M4-220C


>
>
< replied-to message removed by QT >

---------------------------------------------------------------------
55 jeremy 01-23-2006 12:40 AM ET (US)
The shims are to preload the swivel bearings.
The lower chamber needs disassembly and totally cleaning, I.E. no grease atall so the shimmy dampener can do its job. The lower bearing has a felt seal. Grease must not be too light.
Measure spring angle with somebody in back seat.
Remove chain slack on weak (left) spring first.
Safety wire the hairpins, or replace with the new style locking links from Maule.
The locking indent has nothing to do with the anti shimmy.
Jeremy www.maules.com

---------------------------------------------------------------------
56 Dick Butz 01-23-2006 07:50 AM ET (US)
Hi Rick...
I have two ground loops in my Maule...The first was indeed on wet grass and I stupidly hit the left brake and needless to say did a gigantic "Uie" to the left ( thank god for wide spring gear)...The second one was on pavement and everything was correct...Straight, centered, speed about
---------------------------------------------------------------------
60, no wind, flared to a 3 pointer (tail down) stick back, and started heading left toward the runway lights and I applied right rudder and nothing happened...I seemed to loose steering in the tailwheel so I touched the right brake and the next thing I knew I was eating a set of PAPI lights and collecting debris and calling Mattituck for a teardown...I am convinced that the Maule wheel is not the best and I started this looking to answer whether it was just me or are there others that feel the same way ...If there is a better tailwheel what is it?...I have seen a 4x4 ribbed glider tire on a Maule and it looked to be a better setup to take the shock of that heavy tail but I really do not know if this would be any advantage...Also the Scott wheel (3200) looks to be stronger than the Maule as it has two fork legs, equal springs etc, I guess less fussy...I put a new Maule wheel on my plane as I was continually breaking the old one and it looked as if it had seen better days and many repairs...But the first thing I did when I got it was grease it up with a grease gun and it may be that I have over greased it?...I think that I set the chains properly however I found that the chains stretched ( they seem very soft and cheap) and I had to cut out links and retighten them...I don't know...The further I go the behinder I get!...Dick
>
< replied-to message removed by QT >

---------------------------------------------------------------------
57 KernerCo Aviation Services 01-23-2006 11:23 AM ET (US)
Dick,
Dick,
Just reading your description of your groundloop:
Even in appearantly "no-wind" conditions you can get air movement from one side (just one example: heated air pocket just leaving the ground) which can give you a momentarly accellertated x-wind, or you might have drifted for some reason... Anyways, when the Maules heads in one direction,
automatically and instantely put the aileron into the same direction as much as it takes to stop the motion into the direction you don't want to go. Maules with the big fat wing just need to have there wing flown all the time (i.e. on the ground). This reaction needs to be "programmed" into each pilot because a normal reaction for a "not-programmed" pilot is to use the rudder to overcome the movement into the wrong direction.
Sounds as if those brakes and you are not the best friends ( : Good luck.
When teaching this habit and to keep proficient we pick a crosswind day every so often to practise that skill and fly along a long runway in maybe 5ft altitude and work on keeping the fuselage straight along the runway without touching down at slow speed. Practicing left from the centerline, right from the centerline, directly over the centerline, several times along a long runway is a good practise for checking up on those skills.
Happy Maule flying...
Christine


< replied-to message removed by QT >

---------------------------------------------------------------------
58 Guest 01-23-2006 03:05 PM ET (US)
It is nice to see the honest discussion about Maule groundloops. About 5 weeks after purchase of an M-5 with a Scott 3200 tail wheel, on pavement, with 800+ tailwheel hours, I groundlooped the Maule. It was a no wind condition. After landing, on roll out, I wanted to center up on the runway prior to adding power to take off again. I gave left rudder to move to the left and then applied right rudder to stop the mild correction to the left. Nothing happened. Full right rudder and I had no response from the plane. Rudder force was being applied to the tailwheel, but the tail wheel did not have the power to overcome the forces to the left. I should have given right brake instantly and corrected the situation but I hesitated partly in disbelief and partly fearing I had already exceeded the point of no return and would make the situation worse with brakes. Due to the lower speed, the goundloop did not result in a prop strike but did hit the wing tip and bend one gear. I had simply made a correction that could not be undone without the use of brakes.
I watched forums for years and never saw this discussed until I read a pilot review posted on another Maule web site. http://www.flymaule.org/index.php I will quote the section: "A Maule Review" - "Soon, the rudder was against the floor but the airplane was still turning left. Since everything was happening so slowly, just for the heck of it I let it continue to see if the rudder or tailwheel would catch it. They didn't and I had to tap the right brake which straightened it out immediately."
My groundloop resulted from being too passive instead of making the plane go stright by whatever means required.

---------------------------------------------------------------------
59 jeremy 01-23-2006 03:19 PM ET (US)
The tailwheel has little effect in steering the aircraft except in taxi. It is designed to fall in trail even when the rudder is fully deflected. The mass of airplane is trying to get ahead of the retarding force (mainwheels) at slowdown. A judicious application of thrust to pull the mass instead of having it pushed can help but it also allows the pilot to blow air over the rudder to activate it. When the nose is swinging to the right, it also gives some P factor effect.
As pointed out earlier in this thread, the aileron operation is primary.
Jeremy www.maules.com

---------------------------------------------------------------------
60 Dick Butz 01-23-2006 03:48 PM ET (US)
Ok Lets recap...

What I am getting from all of this is
1. The "steerable tailwheel" is of little use when landing for directional control
so it doesn't matter what tailwheel you use a stick is just as good!. 2. The "rudder" is of little use when loosing directional control. 3. Use the aileron to correct directional control by steering into the turn. 4. To land on pavement do a wheelie so you can use the rudder for control. 5. To land short and soft do a 3 pointer in the hopes that the tail wheel will
dig in and slow you down.
6. NEVER use the brakes! unless you are getting to close to the gas pumps.
This is getting more clear all the time...What an unusual aircraft we have chosen to fly!

BWG...Dick Butz

---------------------------------------------------------------------
61 01-23-2006 04:41 PM ET (US)
The forces at work during a G.L. have been theorized and studied over the years ad nauseum. Having heard (and experienced) some of these forces, I can only relate what seemed to make sense to me, from a couple of different sources. First as many have eluded, the effect of the main gear being in front of the CG is the underlying boogeyman and cannot be corrected. It is the nature of the beast (taildragger). As your airspeed drops and control surfaces become ineffective you enter a point of null where no amount of input will correct the overwhelming centrifugal force as the tail tries to swap ends with the nose. Every time we land we pass thru this point of null while slowing. If we have our CG in a direct line with our nose and our direction of travel, we pass through the null without any notice of it. If not, it can be a circus act to get our tail back between our legs. So, there are different ways of correcting an outta' wack centrifugal force. You could use brakes in a ticklish fashion and try to return the CG or tail to the correct position but it's going to be tough. The best way would be to restore the
effectiveness of your control surfaces with a blast of airflow (maybe the last thing you want to do as your butt tries to chew through the seat) but it's what's needed. I have heard several stories, of last second applications of power, saving a victim from a G.L. One other oddity that has been described that may influence your decision to use brakes to straighten out a bad landing is the "tripping effect" of locking up the tire on the outside of a G.L. If you can visualize the tremendous side load of a skidding aircraft and then imagine what happens if you stop the limited rolling motion of your only significant contact with the landing surface, I think you can see what comes next. Collapse of the gear and likely nose over the top of the halted tire, collapsed gear, etc....

Sort of a ramble, but it is what I have gleaned from many aviators with much more experience than myself.

Mark


---------------------------------------------------------------------
62 jeremy 01-23-2006 10:43 PM ET (US)
Dick, the idea is to land on the upwind main only and keep the other off the ground as long as possible with aileron. Tail can be up or down, your choice. The amount of aileron fed in on final, and landing, and rollout, is that required to cancel any sidedrift from your line of landing. The constantly changing amount of rudder input is that required to keep the longtitudonal line of aircraft exactly the same as the line of landing. You need to see an exact point of touchdown and an exact point to end your rollout. Without these targets you cannot achieve your goal.On final your targets will be seen under the left windshield crossbrace. A bit of electricians tape can be placed as far out on the cowl as you can see, approx 8" left of crank centre. Your backsight is a mark straight up from control column on back of glareshield. Place tail and prop directly over a line, look straight ahead approx 1000ft and adjust your front sight on cowl to the line.
Keep the tail directly behind spinner at all times and you will not groundloop.
Jeremy

---------------------------------------------------------------------
63 LIVEOAKRICK@aol.com 01-23-2006 11:42 PM ET (US)
Jeremy,

Don't know if you remember me but you delivered a Maule MX7 to me in Oroville. That last bit of advice that you just gave has kept me out of trouble so far with 450 hours on the ole airplane. Now I have another problem. When you delivered my airplane, you said that the oil cooler needed to be choked down a bit. My oil temperature has always run cool and now I am starting to get a little iron in the oil analysis. I am going up tomorrow and have my mechanic try and determine if my oil thermostat (vermatherm) is stuck open. I have always focused upon the overheat limit and never really focused on adequate oil temp for lubrication.

What do youi recommend?

Rick Libby

---------------------------------------------------------------------
64 jeremy 01-23-2006 11:58 PM ET (US)
Your'e not forgotten. A recent talk with Lycoming, indicates a minimum running temp of 165deg, they would prefer to see 185 and are not concerned to 205. The vernatherm is supposed to bypass at 185. It can stick open and/or closed. If oil temp cannot get high enough because of short flights then many oil changes are recommended. I once heard that it takes an hour of ops. over 165 to boil of the contaminents developed by one start and shutdown.
Jeremy www.maules.com



---------------------------------------------------------------------

65 01-24-2006 12:26 AM ET (US)
Jeremy,

Very good advise.

I am fortunate to be able to have a good friend that is an excellent conventional gear CFI. If I ever feel rusty I just let him beat me up a bit. A few drills he would run by the would be tailwheel pilot were:
1. Dutch rolls in slow flight to solidify coordination.
2. Rolling one main along the runway then come around and do the other. 3. Dead stick 3 point and wheel landings to learn energy management. 4. Wheel landing touch and go to engine failure 3 point. (You need 2-3k of runway for that one)
5. Once he felt you had become proficient (too comfortable) he would say let's start over using just the left half of the runway (or right whichever was more difficult with the current x-wind)

I cringe making the tune-up appointment but know it's worth it in the long run...

Mark

---------------------------------------------------------------------
66 LIVEOAKRICK@aol.com 01-24-2006 02:01 AM ET (US)
Jeremy,

Thanks for the information. I am going to get the oil thermostat tested. I am highly suspect that it is stuck open. Would you suggest running a synthetic oil to offset the incrreased wear?

Rick

---------------------------------------------------------------------
67 jeremy 01-24-2006 12:25 PM ET (US)
Sounds like a good approach to taildragging Mark.
I've been using Exxon Elite with good luck for the past 4 yrs, after breakin of course. It is a little higher weight than the Aeroshell multi. Usually I prefer a straight weight through summer. Gold can Aeroshell has the Lyc. reccomended additive in it.
Jeremy

---------------------------------------------------------------------
68 Chuck 02-01-2006 08:52 PM ET (US)
Jeremy: How many hours on a new engine before you would go to Exxon Elite? Actually my engine was "repaired" by Lycoming for the crankshaft AD. All new bearings, new rings and honed cyclinders. Seems new to me!!
I'm running 30W mineral now as I'm in WI and the temps are never above 30. I have 14 hours on the IO-540, 260 HP now and plan on going to Phillips X-C at 25 hours to finish the break-in. Any thoughts?

Also are you going to Big Creek in July for the Fly-In?

---------------------------------------------------------------------
69 jeremy 02-02-2006 03:38 AM ET (US)
Go to an ashless dispersant non breakin oil after oil consumtion has stabilized, and hard running has re broken those honed cyls. in. So Philips or Exxon at 25 sounds OK. Big Creek is in the datebook after Arlington WA.
Jeremy www.maules.com

---------------------------------------------------------------------
70 Dick Butz 02-17-2006 08:09 AM ET (US)
It's me again...I have just returned from Florida and some training at Air orlando with Rick Blyseth (which I highly reccomend!) where I was training in a new Decathlon and I have a question...I noticed that the tailwheel was manufactured by Avox in Lancaster New York...I believe that they have taken over from Scott in the manufacture of their tailwheels...The interesting thing was that instead of using springs and chains they have eliminated the chains and have instead used long softer wound springs...This looks to me to be a better solution as one of my problems has been keeping the chains at the right tension as per Maule's instructions and they seem to stretch and require re-rigging occasionally...My question is "Has anyone seen this setup with the long springs on the new Decathlon and what are the comments on such a setup?"...Dick

---------------------------------------------------------------------
71 maules.com 02-17-2006 11:54 AM ET (US)
The Scott tailwheel uses tension steering springs, the Maule uses compression type with heavier one on right. Do not use compression type with the Scott as it will bend the steering ears. However, Alaska Bushwheels is building a PMA (Scott) tailwheel with a better steering ear that can use compression steering springs. Alaska Bushwheel also builds a much improved tailspring that goes with a Scott type setup.
Jeremy

---------------------------------------------------------------------
72 LIVEOAKRICK@aol.com 02-22-2006 09:51 AM ET (US)
Jeremy,

As you know, I have a Maule with the Lycoming 180 engine. After 650 hours the engine is showing an increasing trend in iron particulates over a series of oil changes. I recently changed the oil thermostat in an attempt to elevate the oil temperature because I rarely see the oil temp in the green zone. This didn't seem to work. During my last flight, the outside air temp was about 40 degrees and after 30 minutes of flying, my oil temperature guage never reached the green. My question to you is about a winterization modification. Is there such a thing that will legally restrict the oil cooler and elevate the oil temperature. How do you handle this problem in Alaska? Is there a special oil that you would recommend. I have been using Aeroshell 15/50. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

By the way, where did you get that crazy email address.

Rick Libby
Live Oak

---------------------------------------------------------------------
73 jeremy 02-27-2006 03:52 AM ET (US)
Unfortunately no winterization kit. Use silver/metal tape to block off the cooler, maybe wrap it with insulation too. I've been considering a 2inch upward baffle of aluminium across the egress on the top side of the bottom cowl, which may work opposite to the one we put on the bottom side when we need extra cooling. Aeroshell 15/50 should be fine. Fly over someay , I'll take a look.
July 14 15 16 at Big Creek ID for this years Maule flyin.
Jeremy www.maules.com

---------------------------------------------------------------------
74 LIVEOAKRICK@aol.com 02-27-2006 06:55 AM ET (US)
Jeremy,

Thanks for the info on the cooler. I had a visitor yesterday who was looking at my airplane thinking of buying one of his own. I gave him the ole Jeremy sales pitch of "what would you rather have, a station wagon or a 4 wheel drive, pick up truck. I think he is interested.

The Big Creek flyin sounds like fun. Will try and make it if I can.
Rick Libby

---------------------------------------------------------------------
75 Jim Melville 04-04-2006 01:33 PM ET (US)
Okay, here goes. I own a M4-220 and my exhaust stacks keep loosening up. Is there a solution to this. Does anyone have a fix?

---------------------------------------------------------------------
76 maules.com 04-04-2006 03:20 PM ET (US)
If it is on the right side, the support rod often cracks, make it stronger. Otherwise it is usually the upper flange tabs and they get old, worn and weak. Try www.franklinparts.com Susan Prall or cglucas@cox.net , Greg Lucas.
www.maules.com


---------------------------------------------------------------------
77 Doug Brown 04-12-2006 01:05 AM ET (US)
I notice my tires have rotated on the rims, so I'd like to address the problem with screws through the rim into the bead, but I'm curious about specifics.

On the one hand, I recall hearing of using sheet metal screws, which are self-tapping and pointed. On the other, I recall mention on the Maule Owner's Forum of drilling out the hub cap holes and tapping them, then installing screws 3/16" into the bead. Tapped holes would take machine screws, which are blunt, so it is not clear to me how that would work without sharpening them.

What would you advise?


---------------------------------------------------------------------
78 maules.com 04-12-2006 01:46 AM ET (US)
In the field the self tappers were easier. At home the machine screws would be best I think and I would sharpen the end. There is no approval or drawing. Common sense prevails. Spin the tyres and tear a valve, or do the next best thing ie don't let the tyre turn. Probably 1/8" penetration is enough including through hubcap.


---------------------------------------------------------------------
79 Doug Brown 05-07-2006 06:36 PM ET (US)
Jeremy - The screws worked out fine, thanks!

Now a more complex topic: I've been getting a vibration that may have been there when I bought the plane, but gradually, over the past 200 hours, has become distinctly uncomfortable. It is at 1/2 the prop rpm, so at 2100 rpm it is about 17.5 Hz (measured), and feels like an out of balance automobile wheel, so "shaking" might be a better description. It is not really resonant, being apparent at all cruise rpms with power. However, with zero power it is not apparent, even at cruise rpms. I balanced the prop, checked blade tracking and angles, made sure the exhaust hangars aren't too tight, checked for hoses and clamps bypassing the engine mounts, and torqued all mount bolts. Cylinder compressions are reasonable, and JPI shows even EGTs and CHTs.

My thinking is, being at 1/2 prop rpm, this is either a combustion issue (cylinders fire once every two revolutions) or an isolation issue. Since compression and JPI are reasonable, I'm inclined to suspect isolation, so I'm considering replacing the engine mounts.

Have I missed any possibilities?

Thanks,
Doug Brown
M7-235C


---------------------------------------------------------------------
80 maules.com 05-08-2006 02:38 AM ET (US)
Check timing on both mags, within 2deg of eachother.
Check elevator bushings and hingepins, and tailstrut attach points.
Check out of round tyres causing the spring gear to resonate up and down.
Check stiffness of cowling air egress, especially the #10 screw attach points on boot cowl and joint with firewall. Also the centre of the cooling lip.
www.maules.com


---------------------------------------------------------------------
81 Gus 05-27-2006 12:42 PM ET (US)
Hello,
Does someone have the spec's for a 1964 MAULE M-4 JETSEN? I'm looking to find the wing spand and gross weight (4 seater..right)? Is there and wood in the 1964 model or is it all metal? Would I have any problems flying it if I'm a high time Piper Pacer pilot? OH ya and J3 clown.
Thanks

---------------------------------------------------------------------
82 maules.com 05-27-2006 01:14 PM ET (US)
On my site, under specifications, click 'chronology' for basic Maule info. The wings are metal,29'8" span, the gross is 2100 or 2300lbs depends on model. All are 4 seat. The only wood are some fairing strips holding the fabric from the tube fuselage to give it shape, (non structural). Early models had 3 doors and a small baggage door, but it soon became a 4 door system as it is today.Some early models had fabric covered wings but the Jetasen had metal. Figure 700fpm loaded, 125 mph at 7.2gph with 40 gal usable.
Jeremy


83 Gus 05-27-2006 06:37 PM ET (US)
Thanks for your reply, so what's the difference between a 1968 M4-210c and the M-4 JETSEN? Thanks.


84 maules.com 05-27-2006 07:33 PM ET (US)
Best not to get confused my Maule names, use the model M4,M5, M6, X7, M7,M8,MXT7,MT7. Then the # which is hp 145(cont 6cyl),160(lyc.4),180(franklin6 or lyc4),200(lyc4),210(cont6),210tc(lyc4),220(franklin6),235(lyc6),260(lyc6),420(allinson turbine).
With M4, the C denotes the 4 doors from about 1965 on.If no C it is 3 door and a baggage hole door. C on the latest MX7 and M7 denotes wide stance aluminium landing gear 22inch wider than the oleo and an option since 1997.
Jeremy


85 Gus 05-27-2006 07:46 PM ET (US)
Jeremy, are they easy to land? I'm a high time T/W but I'm thinking I'm going to buy one of these planes here in the next 2 weeks. If I may, what should I be looking at? What's AD's? where to look for problems on the plane itself? I know you should have a proper check out...but I'm just going to jump in it and fly it home.
Any thoughts?
Thanks


86 maules.com 05-27-2006 09:48 PM ET (US)
If you can handle a Pacer, then the Maule is a piece of cake. SB and SL lists are on MauleAirInc website. Any airplane needs an inspection before purchase unless its a steal of a deal. Look it over as you would a Pacer. The required ADs can be got from FAA.gov, there are not too many. Fuel lines, gascolater, wing struts, stabilizer support tube, brake pedal tube etc. Depends a bit on engine and airframe . Get the serial # to research ADs, don't believe the log entries only unless of course you know the plane, its life and mechanic.
Jeremy


87 Gus 06-01-2006 01:36 PM ET (US)
Jeremy, Well the one I'm looking at is down in TX getting a fresh annunal.
But the AI said one wing is sitting 5" lower then the other wing. He was saying a Maule guy told him, the landing struts need to have the right amount of fluid in them to sit level. Have you ever heard of such a thing?
I was thinking about making an offer on it next week. He asking $30k
but I was going to offer him $25k and he fixes the unlevel issuse.
WOW insurance is alot $1903.00 per year!
Thanks


88 maules.com 06-01-2006 02:10 PM ET (US)
Oleo oil level has nothing to do with how the aircraft sits. The oleos should be filled to the top anyway and if leaking, replace O rings.
Unequal fuel tank levels can lean a plane abit especially with tip tanks.
The main cause of lean is a worn out oleo spring. The oleo springs should be the same length and be a matched pair of either the early square section or the new type with round section and improved absorption rate. The upper oleo bolts should be NAS (cupped head), an improvement from the older AN bolts.
Your insurance quote is very good.
Jeremy

89 LIVEOAKRICK@aol.com 06-01-2006 05:17 PM ET (US)
In a message dated 6/1/2006 11:13:57 AM Pacific Daylight Time,
qtopic+25-x69whz4UTgF@quicktopic.com writes:

Hi Jeromy,

Have you heard anything about the new MT propeller? It is supposed to do wonders for aircraft like the Husky by adding performance and REDUCING VIBRATIONS.. I am investigating the possiblity of getting the prop approved for the Maule but need a good set of perfomance charts. Do you have some numbers laying around for an MX7-180A.

Thanks,

Rick Libby
Live Oak


90 Dick Butz 06-01-2006 05:42 PM ET (US)
I have been looking into the same for my MX 160C and can't find any info on it...No STC's or anything at this time...I have flown a Decathlon with it and it is really nice and could be a great improvement for Maule owners especially those of us with small engines...My mechanic contacted Maule and they said that they were working on a constant speed prop for the 160 and 180 but would not give out any more info???...Dick Butz

91 maules.com 06-02-2006 02:23 AM ET (US)
I don't know of an MT for the fixed pitch 180 or 160 Maule. Info. on your engines are in your Lyc. engine manuals and you could email MT to see if they have any installations on these engines at present.
Jeremy


92 Peter Boody 06-08-2006 02:25 PM ET (US)
Maule pilots/owners: I am an editor/writer/pilot working as a stringer for Aviation Consumer magazine, preparing their Used Aircraft Guide feature at the back of each issue. Am working on Maules for August, researching a lot of material to become familiar with the airplane. Would any of you care to comment on these questions ....
1. are there any popular mods for Maules besides Micro Aero's VG kits?
2. what do you consider the most problematic and important ADs and/or SB's on your model (advise which model)?
3. what is (are) your favorite thing(s) about Maules?
4. least favorite?
5. I see very little evidence in the last 10 years of accidents that flying over gross weight is a big factor in Maule mishaps, despite legends from the bush that it's flown overloaded all the time. Any thoughts on that? Biggest mishaps are, not surprisingly, runway loss of control and, to a lesser extent, engine problems including fuel exhaustion/contamination.
Thanks!


93 rdonmckeown@aol.com 06-08-2006 03:45 PM ET (US)
I have owned two Maules so far. There is not much to complain about. The only thing I would change is to get rid of that tab on the rudder. It is there for those who don't know how to fly coordinated and is a pain in a cross wind. I would rather not comment on personal
experience of flying overweight. I would say that what the bush people tell you can be taken as truth. All in all, I would have to say that a Maule is the best dollar value in aviation. They do what they were designed to do very well and are a blast to fly! Don


________________________________________________________________
94 rdonmckeown@aol.com 06-08-2006 03:46 PM ET (US)
I have owned two Maules so far. There is not much to complain about. The only thing I would change is to get rid of that tab on the rudder. It is there for those who don't know how to fly coordinated and is a pain in a cross wind. I would rather not comment on personal
experience of flying overweight. I would say that what the bush people tell you can be taken as truth. All in all, I would have to say that a Maule is the best dollar value in aviation. They do what they were designed to do very well and are a blast to fly! Don



95 maules.com 06-08-2006 05:39 PM ET (US)
Popular mods offered by the factory are VG's, Full swingup windows, Observation glass doors, window and skylight, 3 blade prop on 235 and 260hp models, straight and amphibious floats, skis, IFR packages and autopilots and JPI eng. analizers. There are many other smaller items also. Alaska Bushwheels tundra tyres and h.d. bush tailwheel are often fitted which add a strong margin of safety and access to unprepared landing places, ie, mountain tops, ridges, beaches, river bars or the more mundane cowpasture with gopherholes. In the past Sorenson offered a 70/90/120 gal cropsprayer kit. Tost and Schweitzer towhooks are also available from the factory.
There are no big problem AD's, the 1995 strut AD is low priced and has been completed on most aircraft or a biennial inspection is still acceptable.
The Lyc. SB569/A is raising hackles for 235 and 260hp owners as they feel that it is Lycomings responsibility to make good on their product rather than unload their mistake onto the unsuspecting buyer especially after paying out on SB566.
Favourites are Versatility and Safety. The fatality rate is so low because the aircraft is very predictable and forgiving and when a mistake 'is' made the rugged rollcage seems to protect the occupant beyond the norm.
Maule is legendary for load capability. I purchased an M7 that had flown around the world for 450hrs with loads often at 1900lbs. I studied it carefully for 8 months of operation and could find nothing untoward.
Runway loss of control is a result of poor training and that is partly exacerbated by the Insurance co's request for 'hours' experiance instead of landings to a full stop in crosswind conditions. Many new owners build the upto 25hrs requirement on long crosscountry with few landings. If fully studied you can make 80 diferent landings in a taildragger Maule.
I have operated Maules for 31 years in most situations.
Jeremy


96 Dick Butz 06-08-2006 06:53 PM ET (US)
I have found that the Maule's greatest problem is the lack of Maule qualified instructors, and although it is good value for money it is hard to realise your investment back when selling and generally hard to sell...It takes some time to learn to land the Maule but when you do it sure is fun !!! Dick Butz


97 Dick Butz 06-08-2006 06:57 PM ET (US)
While I am here, possibly Jeremy would know if it is possible to have the factory re-power a MX7 160c or 180 hp. to a 225 hp. being as they have all the paper on past models like the M5 225...Would it be cost effective to do so?...Dick


98 maules.com 06-08-2006 09:12 PM ET (US)
Dick, you can repower to 180 fp or cs prop, however because of other things that have to be changed at the same time, it's usually not economically sensible. If your engine is shot, it's a different story.
Usually best to sell your present plane and buy another unless you have personally customized it or paid a lot when you bought it. The 180hp f.p. models turn over pretty quickly but the 160hp is a slower sale. About $9000 between them for same year,condition,hours and equipment.
Jeremy


99 LIVEOAKRICK@aol.com 06-11-2006 09:43 AM ET (US)
Jeramy,
I asked earlier about the new MT Prop and don't remember if you responded. I called the the US rep about getting an STC for my 180 hp MX7 but they haven't gotten back to me. My friend purchased one for his Husky and feels that he has really enhanced the performance of the airplane. It seems to me that the reduction in vibration and elimination of the cracked mufflers would be enough to justify changing over.

Also, what is your opionion of vg's? I don't seem to have any problem with a clean wing and haven't felt a need to make the investment.

Rick Libby
Live Oak


100 maules.com 06-11-2006 02:20 PM ET (US)
Afew posts back re MT. Muffler cracks are usually a wrongly mounted tailpipe and/or backfireing on decent. The Lyc O360 is in itself a shaky engine at idle especially. If your's is bad, then maybe a dynamic balance is in order.
VG's are an enhancement to slow speed ops. and especially to aileron and elevator effectiveness. Most users are happy they fitted them.
Jeremy


101 Dick Butz 06-11-2006 03:40 PM ET (US)
Rick
As I said before I have contacted the US rep (
http://www.flight-resource.com/ ) for MT Prop and he was very
helpful...However...There is no STC for the Maule 160 or 180 and the only way you can get one on your plane is to do a "Field Order" with your local FAA...HAH!...My mechanic said lots of luck with that!...US/MT said that they could create a 2 or three blade, electric or oil controlled (depends on whether the crank is hollow or not) prop in lengths to suit your needs (a 74" three blade would be way cool) and they have any required paper work necessary to provide the FAA with any questions they might have...There is an STC for the 172 (they have never sold one believe it or not), the Super Cub ( a 20% improvement in all flight characteristics), and the Husky among others but no Maule as of yet...

This is an e-mail from my mechanic to me concerning the prop for my MX7-160C...

Good morning Dick, I called Maule to get their perspective on the prop installation and they had already evaluated it. They say they have in the works another prop that will give even better performance. They expect to have approval by the end of the year. That doesn't help for this summer, but my opinion is to wait. It will be difficult to get a field approval without Maule,so backing. If there isn't an STC or alternate prop on the type certificate there is usually a valid reason. That's all for now. Jeff @ Columbia aviation.

It may be that a Maule dealer (Jeremy ?) can get some info from Maule...I e-mailed them with no reply...Dick


102 LIVEOAKRICK@aol.com 06-12-2006 09:11 AM ET (US)
Sounds like the process for getting approval on the new prop is underway. My friend owns a Husky and says that the new MT prop has made a tremendous improvement on his airplane. It comes down like a rock when he pulls power off allowing him to land over obstacles with a lot less landing roll. He is able to cruise at normal speed with reduced power, saving fuel. His take off roll is ridiculously short and the reduced weight shifts the CG aft enough to make three point landings much easier for him. The added benefit is less vibration and a quieter ride so that he can listen to his XM radio on his Garmin 396. I want one.

Live Oak Rick


103 Phil Stewart 06-12-2006 09:12 AM ET (US)
Anyone out there flying a MX7-180A, fixed prop on floats ? If so, which prop are you using, performance, speed, takeoff distance, are you happy with it ? etc etc etc. Thanks, Phil Stewart

104 maules.com 06-14-2006 07:36 PM ET (US)
Mauleflight was using an MX7 160 with fp prop for floatplane training, stock prop and plane, Aqua floats. The 180hp is certified on amphibs which are heavier and more drag. Aqua might give you some numbers.
The MXT7 180A is also certified.

The MT prop program is on standby at the moment to allow engineering resource space to work on more pressing projects. Diesel, highgross, doors, etc.
Jeremy


---------------------------------------------------------------------

105 Chuck Jarecki 06-16-2006 09:59 AM ET (US)
I am a backcountry pilot from Montana and a founding director of the Recreational Aviation Foundation (RAF), a 501, c-3 corporation dedicated to preserving backcountry airstrips, acquiring new airstrips and educating pilots on back country flying. I have been flying the back country for 40 years. At the invitation of Maule owners Chuck and Judy Aldrian and Bob and Judy Gillett, my wife, Penny, and I will be at Big Creek on July 15 and 16 to explain about the RAF. You can check out more beforehand on our web site: www.recreationalaviationfoundation.org.
You can e-mail me at:skywagon@centurytel.net
See you in Idaho. Chuck Jarecki N7782K (wheels) N8702Z (floats)
106 Peter Boody 06-16-2006 10:30 AM ET (US)
I'd like to thank those who responded to my query about Maules for Avcon's used aircraft guide. You have helped me get it right and I thank you.
Peter Boody

---------------------------------------------------------------------

107 Phil Stewart 06-20-2006 01:04 PM ET (US)
Jeremy: thanks for info. I have put about 250 hrs on my Maule and really love it. Unfortunately, the instructor who helped me transition into the plane never flew a maule and I think I am flying it about like a Cessna 172. Would like to learn more about its unique STOL capabilities. Phil


108 Jeremy Ainsworth 06-20-2006 01:59 PM ET (US)
Phil, call me and I'll try to get you on track.
Jeremy


---------------------------------------------------------------------


109 JeffBrown@flightbrief.net 06-26-2006 04:13 PM ET (US)
Having given about 10,700 hours dual instruction - with 2,100 of that in Maules (MX-7/180a-c/160/235). There are some peculiarities. A new Maule pilot should carefully explore his crosswind limits as he learns proper technique. The VGs give a slight edge on control at the bottom end of the A/S range for short field landings. The additional flap setting will help a bit as well. I have found a (very) small amount of power 50-150 RPM added during the final moments before round-out and held until touchdown add considerable controlability. I have a nice MX-7-180B for sale and a well-used M7-160 (Both tailwheel), both 1995. jbrown@flightbrief.net

---------------------------------------------------------------------


110 maules.com 06-27-2006 01:41 AM ET (US)
Jeff what area are you, in case I have customers there in need of Maule instruction?
Jeremy
---------------------------------------------------------------------


111 Phil Stewart 06-28-2006 08:03 AM ET (US)
Jeremy: thanks for your offer to help me over the phone. I will have to delay my call because wife and I are on an extended cruise on our boat "Wings". We are doing the "Loop" from Florida up east coast thru Great Lake region, down Mississippi, Tenn-Tom to Mobile and back home. Presently in Clayton NY undergoing repairs. Call in Fall. Thanks, Phil Stewart
---------------------------------------------------------------------


112 Jeremy Ainsworth 06-28-2006 07:27 PM ET (US)
Sounds like a heck of a trip, wish I was doing the same.
Jeremy

---------------------------------------------------------------------

113 hatin11r 06-29-2006 08:30 AM ET (US)
Jeremy....are you going to be back on the "Maule Mods" site? I think the $35 will turn off alot of folks.Hope you are not one of them.We need your talents.....Herman.

---------------------------------------------------------------------


114 maules.com 06-29-2006 02:33 PM ET (US)
At present I'm on this site which may eventually become a multi thread site, and on www.flymaule.org run by David Gore.
The administrator at maulemods aparently wants to sell his information and has stated that my help and info. is for my benefit,and has demanded I stay off his site, a narrow viewpoint in my opinion. Maulemods is a young business, probably trying to find it's way to a profitable position with whatever works for them.
I work on the premise of sharing info. hopefully to prevent accident and mistakes.
Jeremy


---------------------------------------------------------------------

115 Dick Butz 06-29-2006 02:43 PM ET (US)
What Rubbish as we say in Bermuda!
Thank you Jeremy for all of the help you have given us as it is greatly appreciated...I to believe that the more we share the better it gets for all...You never know who has the answer to that perplexing problem that you have been wracking your brain over!...Good luck to Maulemods may they live long and prosper (but not at my expense!) I'll go wherever you go thanks!...Dick Butz N41510

---------------------------------------------------------------------


116 HERMAN BLOOMBERG 06-29-2006 05:41 PM ET (US)
Jeremy......wow,that is too bad this is what Maule Mods has become.I thought we all did a good job sharing and keeping the Maule crowd informed.Well atleast I know where to find you.Will be interesting to see what happens to the M.M.site,again what a shame.....Herman.



---------------------------------------------------------------------

117 telling it how it is 07-03-2006 04:23 PM ET (US)
I can say it here I would be carefull dealing with maule mods I think he is the biggest bull dung talker ever everytime I talk to him I got another lie.

---------------------------------------------------------------------


118 Tom Donnelly 07-03-2006 07:16 PM ET (US)
Sulphur Creek Ranch closed.

For those going into the Idaho backcountry ( Maule Fly-in etc.) I just found that the Sulphur Creek Ranch was sold and the new owner is making it totally private. I understand the runway is "X"'ed out.

Tom


---------------------------------------------------------------------

119 LIVEOAKRICK@aol.com 07-03-2006 07:45 PM ET (US)
Tom,

That is a shame! There goes breakfast.

Rick


---------------------------------------------------------------------

120 TomD 07-17-2006 06:14 PM ET (US)
Big Creek Fly in Pics.

I have a shared album at the following URL:

http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome...bOGjNyyZvxg&notag=1

Professional photographers out there have nothing to worry about.

TD


---------------------------------------------------------------------

121 Christine Kerner 07-17-2006 06:31 PM ET (US)
Thank you for sharing, Tom. It would be great to have some of your pictures on the Maulepilots.org site. If you would like to share them there, I could sent you upload information or you could email me higher resolution pictures to ck@maulepilots.org. If you like to upload them, please email me your email address so that I can set you up with a password
Thanks
Christine
ck@maulepilots.org

---------------------------------------------------------------------

122 07-17-2006 06:32 PM ET (US)
Tom,

Thanks for sharing.

I was at Johnson Creek for the BackCountryPilot.org fly-in and never did get over to Big Creek. You can see some of my pictures at
http://www.backcountrypilot.org/gallery/thumbnails.php?album=188

Mark N6EA

1971 Maule M4-220C


---------------------------------------------------------------------

123 Tom Donnelly 07-17-2006 07:35 PM ET (US)
Mark;

The link below is not a happy camper. It stalls out in both Internet Explorer and Firefox.

Tom


---------------------------------------------------------------------

124 07-17-2006 07:52 PM ET (US)
Tom,

Backcountrypilot.org seems to be on the fritz right now.

Hopefully the link will work when the site comes back online.

Mark

---------------------------------------------------------------------

126 Tom Donnelly 07-19-2006 02:44 PM ET (US)
Christine;

I can upload the pics, but all the ones on the Shutterfly album are in the 800k -1.2mb range. I am assuming you would like something smaller.
TD


---------------------------------------------------------------------

128 christine Kerner 07-21-2006 04:26 AM ET (US)
Tom and everybody with photos from the 2006 Maule Fly-In to share: I have highspeed internet and am happy to receive your photos of any size, whether it is 60k or 2mb. I can easily reduce the size of the picture for publishing purposes. If the resolution is too low with a small picture, then it won't be as presentable at a decent size. Please email me Maule Flyin pix (Jeremy did already and I would like to publish his together with yours -I will give credit to each photographer unless not wanted).
If you prefer to upload photos, I will set up a directory with password to do so - I would need your email address in order to send you upload info.
EMAIL: photos @ maulepilots . org (without the gaps - SPAM protection) - Thank You
Christine - wish I had been there!!!!


---------------------------------------------------------------------

129 Orin Durey 07-22-2006 12:30 AM ET (US)
Great to see everybody at Big Creek and associate faces with names. Made it home OK yesterday after a couple of extended stays at Hanna, Alberta, and La Ronge, Saskatchewan. Still smoke in northern Saskatchewan enroute to Stony Rapids. AvGas a challenge at Stony--none at one vendor but plenty at the other. C$1.41/litre (about US$4.74/gallon). Good to be home with the bugs and NSW and 1.5 million caribou (C$2.76/litre--US$9.29/gallon). Y'all eat yer hearts out and come visit. Gotta put my big AK BushWheels on and go out in the Thelon Wildlife Sanctuary.


---------------------------------------------------------------------

130 Hatin11r 07-23-2006 01:20 PM ET (US)
Tom D......so what is the story on that Cessna wreck in your photo's? When did that happen,folks hurt,etc......Herman.

---------------------------------------------------------------------

131 Tom Donnelly 07-23-2006 03:01 PM ET (US)
My understanding is that the pilot was up walking around when people got to the site, but she had some cuts. The man sitting in the co-pilots position had some breaks and cuts. I don't know what the person in the back suffered but my understanding is that the injuries were minor.

Considering the condition of the aircraft the injuries could have been much worse.

Someone else may have a better update.

TD

---------------------------------------------------------------------


132 HERMAN BLOOMBERG 07-23-2006 11:53 PM ET (US)
Tom....was this at your fly-in or an earlier time?What was the event,landing or take-off.....Herman.


---------------------------------------------------------------------

133 Tom Donnelly 07-24-2006 12:27 AM ET (US)
Happened Wed before we got there on Thursday for the Maule fly in. Was a departure accident. Reports that the plane kept drifting to the right and ended up in the trees.

TD

---------------------------------------------------------------------



134 maules.com 07-24-2006 02:06 AM ET (US)
As I heard it from Scott of the Big Creek lodge, he and the pilot's husband were watching as she took off with a couple passengers,(maybe a relative).She had flown other trips before, and it was about 8.30am, the airplane turned to the right after lift off, caught a tree top, broke a wing and dropped in. A broken leg and other injuries but dripping/running fuel caused skin burn. Lucky no spark and no ignition. Scott was able to help cut the belts and get them out. The C182 was totally destroyed. An amazing escape and quick action by those watching.


---------------------------------------------------------------------

135 Gene Swan 07-25-2006 12:05 AM ET (US)
I hope everyone had a good time. I had to become an ex-Maule owner under less than desirable circumstances and will be grounded for the forseeable future. Needless to say, I missed seeing all of my Maule buddies at Big Creek. Keep the pictures coming for all of us unlucky enough not to make it there.

Gene

---------------------------------------------------------------------


136 Jeff 08-04-2006 05:02 PM ET (US)
So now that everyone is home from the Big Creek Fly In and saw the 182 crash. Do you suppose any of you that were there would fess up to becomming new owners of a towbar, maps, Fly Idaho Book, Icom Radio etc that were taken from the crash seen of the 182 wreck.


---------------------------------------------------------------------

137 Don 08-04-2006 06:25 PM ET (US)
I lost a tent and a survival kit. Anyone seen them?

Don


---------------------------------------------------------------------

138 maules.com 08-04-2006 09:15 PM ET (US)
Jeff, it's highly unlikely to be a visiting Maule pilots action, especially a Cessna towbar. Much more likely, as the accident was Weds am and Maules did not arrive til Thurs eve and later, that someone affiliated with the lodge or in the valley got them in safekeeping right away. Don ,I once flew away from my campsite completely forgetting my two camp chairs. I imagine all this stuff will surface in the valley sometime soon.
Jeremy


---------------------------------------------------------------------

139 Greg & Barbara 08-04-2006 09:17 PM ET (US)
Jeff, Did you contact Scott and Trudy (owners of Big Creek Lodge) and see if they had this stuff or if they knew anything about the missing items?


---------------------------------------------------------------------

140 Orin Durey 08-04-2006 11:14 PM ET (US)
I was the second-to-last plane to leave Sunday midday about 10:30 am. Didn't see anything laying around. Saturday I found a canopy cover blowing around in the wind up by the campground and tied it to a
tiedown chain. Hope it ended up with its owner.

...Orin

_______________________________
do440 at ncf dot ca Orin Durey, Baker Lake, Nunavut
VY&#D8;DU M5-235C

---------------------------------------------------------------------


141 LIVEOAKRICK@aol.com 08-05-2006 12:19 AM ET (US)
When I went down to take a look at the airplane midday Friday, the radio stack had already been removed. Saturday evening the airplane was snaked out of the woods by someone from Yellow Pine. He and his wife pulled it out with a two wheel drive Chevy Suburban. Why wasn't the FAA there to investigate the accident? Why the hurry to remove the wreck?

Rick Libby

---------------------------------------------------------------------

142 LIVEOAKRICK@aol.com 08-05-2006 12:56 AM ET (US)
Who is this guy?

Is that a Cessna tow bar in his back pocket?

Rick Libby


---------------------------------------------------------------------

143 don@yacht-pros.com 08-05-2006 01:58 AM ET (US)
We looked at the 182 wreckage on midday Friday, too. I did not see any maps, towbars, icom radios, etc. in the area. There was a component in the stack wedged in the panel. Lots of fuel in the lower wing. I saw some folks dragging the fuselage and parts off on Saturday on a trailer. Can't say I saw any looters in the neighborhood.
Don Kneeland N9019E


---------------------------------------------------------------------

144 Jeff 08-05-2006 12:17 PM ET (US)
LIVEOAKRICK, The FAA did do there invesigation on Thursday. And the people seen taking the airplane was an insurance salvage company and they took the airplane to Boise. Although in the last 24 hours many of the missing items have mysteriously showed up.


---------------------------------------------------------------------

145 maules.com 08-05-2006 02:34 PM ET (US)
Jeff, thankou for the update. All indicators suggested the items were in the valley somewhere.
Jeremy


---------------------------------------------------------------------

146 Bill Crabbe 08-10-2006 03:05 PM ET (US)
Edited by author 08-10-2006 03:29 PM
Maule Mechanic
Jeremy, I took your advice a bought a Maule. I just could not justify the new model but maybe someday. Anyway I need advice from Maulers on a mechanic near Palo Alto, CA. who have experienced cutomer satisfaction. I went with a M7 235C, 1997.
Any inputs would be appreciated.
Thanks Bill


---------------------------------------------------------------------

147 Tom D. 08-10-2006 03:50 PM ET (US)
Bill;

No help w/ mechanic that far South, but congrats on your new bird.

Keep the rubber side down and pointy end forward.

Tom
148 W.O.\(Bill\) Crabbe 08-10-2006 04:37 PM ET (US)
Tom,
Will do! Blue skies!
Bill

W.O.(Bill) Crabbe
Union City, CA 94587


---------------------------------------------------------------------

149 maules.com 08-10-2006 05:02 PM ET (US)
Bill, Vern Miller of Reid Hillview would have been a recomendation but he died recently in an accident and I don't know what his operation is doing. 2 Genes of South County have worked on Maules in the past. There is a shop at Concord with good words spoken of it, but maybe too far. There are Maules at most of the airports around there but I don't know of specific complaints or praises.
Jeremy


---------------------------------------------------------------------

150 LIVEOAKRICK@aol.com 08-11-2006 09:01 AM ET (US)
Jeremy,

How much speed do you lose in cruise with the tundra tires? I am thinking that the 26 inch tires might be a good compromise over the bigger 33 inch size giving soft field performance and yet reduced drag. What is your opinion on this? Also, would you recommend the bigger tail wheel?

Rick Libby
Live Oak, CA


---------------------------------------------------------------------

151 maules.com 08-11-2006 06:32 PM ET (US)
The speed of the airplane decides how much drag is induced. If you cruise at the lower speeds such as a Cub then the loss is not as significant as on a 260hp Maule for instance. At the higher speeds, from 7.00x6 to 8.5x6 will lose from 4 to 5 mph and another 4 to 5 when going to 26" and another 4 with 31", but if in the slower Mx7 180A these drag factors will reduce. I would imagne for your se the 26" would be adequate. If loaded and on soft ground the big tailwheel will help takeoff but not landing. You probably don't need the cushion on rocks.
Jeremy


---------------------------------------------------------------------

152 Orin Durey 08-12-2006 12:30 AM ET (US)
I've got the 26" Alaska BushWheel mains and the fat tailwheel. I find at 12 psi they're perfect for soft sand eskers out on the Barrens. Running them soft means hardly breaking the surface of the soft sand. I had the fat tailwheel on my Maule at Big Creek, but I haven't put the 26" tundra tires on yet. I've got to take my Maule out south for the annual soon. Plan to put them on when I get back.

One added benefit of the 26" tires is they don't slow me down much at endurance cruise. I hardly notice any difference. I'm running 50% at 20"/2050 and still getting 105 knots. My first fuel stop going south is often Thompson, Manitoba, at 500 nm. With the GEM I'm leaning the O-540 aggressively and getting almost 9gph, or 7&#BC; hours or almost 800 sm. The Maule has turned out to be a much greater airplane than I ever hoped for when I bought it 11 years ago.

Oh yeah, and the 26" tires make decent skiis. I ended up in Wawa, Ontario, a couple years ago at Xmas. Didn't have time to take the big tires off after a big two-week search we did up here on the Barrens before I headed south. The taxi way was drifted in at Wawa with 8" pillow drifts and the big soft tires just taxii'd over the top of the drifts. "Poor man's skiis" for my "poor man's helicopter".

One drawback is at -35&#B0;C they keep their "D" shape all during the taxi and takeoff roll. ...budda..budda...budda...budda...budda... Putting some more air in them solves that problem.

Thanks, ...Orin

> How much speed do you lose in cruise with the tundra tires? I am
> thinking that the 26 inch tires might be a good compromise over the
> bigger 33 inch size giving soft field performance and yet reduced
> drag. What is your opinion on this? Also, would you recommend the
> bigger tail wheel?


> The speed of the airplane decides how much drag is induced. If you
> cruise at the lower speeds such as a Cub then the loss is not as
> significant as on a 260hp Maule for instance. At the higher speeds,
> from 7.00x6 to 8.5x6 will lose from 4 to 5 mph and another 4 to 5 when
> going to 26" and another 4 with 31", but if in the slower Mx7 180A
> these drag factors will reduce. I would imagne for your se the 26"
> would be adequate. If loaded and on soft ground the big tailwheel will
> help takeoff but not landing. You probably don't need the cushion on
> rocks.

_______________________________
do440 at ncf dot ca Orin Durey, Baker Lake, Nunavut
VY&#D8;DU M5-235C


---------------------------------------------------------------------

153 Daniel Clark 08-12-2006 10:57 PM ET (US)
I am an A&P mechanic (and of course a pilot - what fun is fixing without flying?) that will be in the Palo Alto, CA area (I'm a student at Stanford for my mechanical engineering masters degree). I am familiar with tube and fabric planes and, in fact, I am in the process of restoring an M5...I'll have to let that go when I'm at school but if Mr. Bill Crabbe (or anyone else) is still looking for someone to work on his Maule (or of course talk about tube and rag taildraggers, fly, anything...etc Smile in that area please let me know.

Or if anyone knows contact info for Mr. Crabbe send me an e-mail - I'd enjoy getting in touch.

Daniel Clark
daniel.clark@stanford.edu
BTW: I am looking for a McCauley prop for my M5 project - it's one of those old threaded two blade ones that are hard to find (2A34C22-N)...any hints are appreciated.
154 Tom D. 08-13-2006 01:59 AM ET (US)
Daniel;

Try NorthWest Propeller in Seattle (Puyallup?). I sold them my 2 blade for an M5-235C.

TD

---------------------------------------------------------------------

155 Bill Crabbe 08-13-2006 12:58 PM ET (US)
Daniel,
Hi Daniel,
Got your message and happy to make your acquaintance. I am fying to Texas to pick up my 1997 M7,235C on the 23rd of August. I will be returning on about the 27th. I just had the plane annualed in Texas and it was annualed at the factory in 2005. However I am planning on changing oil an inspection evey 25 - 50hrs. I know a few other taildragger guys who may be interested in your knowledge/talent so give me your contact info to pass on. I sent you an email with my address.
Regards
Bill


---------------------------------------------------------------------

156 8.50 x 6 inner tubes 08-21-2006 12:44 PM ET (US)
I seem to remember folks asking about 850 x 6 inner tubes.

I just found that Desser Tire www.desser.com is getting in a limited supply in about two weeks.

TD


---------------------------------------------------------------------

157 Bill Crabbe 08-21-2006 02:41 PM ET (US)
YOKE GRIPS!
Does anybody have experience with the fit of the SX100 yoke grips or any other make that fits a Maule 7 yoke and where to ge them?


---------------------------------------------------------------------

158 Phil Stewart 08-23-2006 09:14 AM ET (US)
Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
This forum is locked: you cannot post, reply to, or edit topics.   This topic is locked: you cannot edit posts or make replies.    MaulePilots.Org Forum Index -> Script from previous MaulePilots Quicktopics Forum All times are GMT - 10 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Site design by BackcountryPilot.Org